mazarin221b replied to your post: I decided bird has had enough settling…

I WILL NEVER GET SICK OF THE BIRB POSTS. <333 Raz is awesome.

:D!

I feel like I should be providing more adorable baby bird pics, but the fact is that the bird spends like 85% of its time sitting on the edge of the food cup clicking its beak and looking incredibly pleased with itself.  (I have like six perches in there bird, pick one and sit on it.)

timrous-beastie:

andrewneilblog:

'Coalition Government Colouring and Activity Book' - Tom Pride 

Colour Iain’s face a deep shade of cock

(via loolaa)

I decided bird has had enough settling-in time, and it was time to begin teachings and learnings.  In these photos, bird is demonstrating the lesson I learned, which is that you remove the food cup from the cage before trying to teach it anything.  Bird cannot talk, but is clearly conveying a message, and that message is: “Bitch, I don’t need your shit, I have all the crunchies right here.

I looked at my clock and was surprised to realize that I’d actually spent 30-35 minutes working with the bird, which is probably enough for a first lesson anyway.  Coming from a breeder where it was hand-raised for the past month, bird is extremely tame and used to being handled.  The trouble, if there is any, is that the baby doesn’t know how to step up yet, which means if you want it out of the cage, you have to grab.  So the past few times I’ve handled the bird have involved me grabbing as it tried to flutter away from me, and then it getting stuffed in boxes and having frightening adventures.  Naturally it is now a bit shy of my hands.  I want it to learn that hands are nice and bring good things.

I’ve learned that baby doesn’t try to escape, even when I open the big cage door, so I opened it and sat in front of the cage and spent a while talking to the bird, showing it my hands, and then offering a millet spray.  It was happy to go after the millet, so I used that as an excuse to get my hand within a couple inches.  I discovered that baby is fine with my hands as long as I don’t move too quickly or come from above like I’m going to grab.  It also tolerates being touched on the feet, belly, and cheeks to some extent, although I did get bit once and it seemed wary of these touches.  But baby was alert, happy, responding eagerly to the millet, so I decided what the hell and decided to start clicker training. 

The first step is just teaching association of the clicker and the treat anyway, so I started clicking whenever it went for a fresh bite of millet.  Guides warn you that birds are sometimes alarmed by the clicker, but this bird does not seem to care.  I held the clicker hidden and far away at first, but then I started holding the clicker in the treat hand.  Then again, saying “what the hell,” I decided to see if I could start touch training.  (It was really too early for this I think, because I probably haven’t given the bird enough chances to understand that the click means a treat is coming, but I got over-excited.)  So I started providing a stick (the butt end of a wooden paintbrush) and rewarding when the bird touched it.  After about 5 or 6 repetitions, bird was like, “Peace out” and jumped in the food bowl.  So, lesson over I guess.

I know it’s important in training for the animal to perceive the lesson as a game, but I didn’t realize how inherently fun I would find this.  :D  Yay bird friend!

Also I should officially announce: bird now has a name, and that name is Raz.  Tiny name for tiny bird.  (But with attitude, as prettyarbitrary pointed out.)  Is it short for something?  No.  Is just Raz.

(Future birb posts, of which there may well be a lot, will be tagged budgie and raz, if anyone gets sick of this and wants to block the posts.)

lawless523:

lindentreeisle:

saintdeanthomas:

If you aren’t reading Sex Criminals, then I have two questions: …why do you hate fun and when did you decide to not love yourself?

Oh god.  I only have the first two issues.  Clearly I need to get more of them.

Is that a magazine?

Nope, it’s a comic book!  A wonderful, funny comic book.  The premise is that the main characters make time temporarily stop when they orgasm.  *looks it up on Comixology and discovers that you can buy it for 99 cents an issue*

Uh, excuse me, I just thought of something I need to do.  *hurries away*

saintdeanthomas:

If you aren’t reading Sex Criminals, then I have two questions: …why do you hate fun and when did you decide to not love yourself?

Oh god.  I only have the first two issues.  Clearly I need to get more of them.

(via madmaudlingoes)

Still thinking of name for bird

I was kind of ashamed when I went into the vet today and had to tell them my bird still didn’t have a name.

Bird was mightily displeased by the long vet-journey!  It yelled at me, then at the vet, then at me some more.  It’s so cute when it’s pissed off.  <3

kaleidomusings:

felicefawn:

Coloring embryos by injecting dye into eggs before they hatch has been practiced for a number of years. It is done to identify the young of certain hatches or groups. And it makes it easier to observe movements of wild birds (especially water fowl) after they leave the nests.

The process of coloring chicks by injecting dye into the eggs also provides an opportunity to study early feather growth. Juvenile plumage will replace the colored down in about two weeks. As this happens, the dyed background amid new growing feathers provides a constantly changing pattern.

While it is possible to inject eggs from about the 10th to 19th days of incubation, the period from the 11th to 14th days appears to be ideal. Only one treatment is necessary if the injection is done at this time. When injections are made after the 14th day the color usually remains localized because the embryo occupies most of the egg; so it may be necessary to inject the egg in more than one place.

Harmless vegetable dyes, such as food coloring dyes sold in grocery stores, work very satisfactorily.

This does not harm the chicks in any way, and eventually as they mature their adult feathers push through and they develop normally with their standard coloured feathers.

The coloring is really interesting but just watch this video because it’s a bunch of chicks chasing a shiny piece of wrapper and it’s so freaking adorable.

(via madmaudlingoes)

kevinbolk:

Mister T is Sarah’s spirit animal. Read MORE “I’m My Own Mascot” here.

kevinbolk:

Mister T is Sarah’s spirit animal. Read MORE “I’m My Own Mascot” here.

importantbirds:

YES I producing the sensitive reporbs come back laterm

importantbirds:

YES I producing the sensitive reporbs come back laterm

(via madmaudlingoes)

bakerstreetbabes:

Every day is Lestrade Appreciation Day!