pepperandpals:

pepperandpals:

pepperandpals:

Pls helb poof birb obtain millet seeb.

Guess who’s getting millet later today.

pepperandpals:

pepperandpals:

pepperandpals:

Pls helb poof birb obtain millet seeb.

Guess who’s getting millet later today.

I should’ve named this birb Houdini.
So I put Raz in the travel cage around 10:15 am Friday.  By noon Sunday, he was determined to escape- running up and down biting the joints of the cage.  I thought he was just throwing an adorable budgie tantrum because he wanted to come out.  Little did I realize that he was actually testing security.  By mid-afternoon, he had learned to stick his little head and neck out between the bars.  A couple hours later, he’d progressed to focusing on the corners, bracing himself an inch or so away from the corner and using the leverage to wiggle himself between the bars on the opposite side of the corner.  (Keep in mind, I took him out several times over the course of the afternoon, but whenever I put him back in, he’d rest for a while and then go back to it.)  At 6:45 pm today, I walked into the room just in time to see him finally wiggle the last of the way through the bars.
My budgie taught himself to escape his travel cage in less than 7 hours. 
From this I have learned two things:
I really should not have bought a travel cage with more than half inch bar spacing.  (It was 3/4 of an inch!  Who could predict that a quarter of an inch made such a huge difference!)
Budgies are wicked smart.
I can see how someone would think a bird is a lot of work or money or time, but not how they’d think a bird is boring.  Raz has loads of personality, he’s clever and stubborn and bold as brass, and getting to know him continues to be fascinating.

I should’ve named this birb Houdini.

So I put Raz in the travel cage around 10:15 am Friday.  By noon Sunday, he was determined to escape- running up and down biting the joints of the cage.  I thought he was just throwing an adorable budgie tantrum because he wanted to come out.  Little did I realize that he was actually testing security.  By mid-afternoon, he had learned to stick his little head and neck out between the bars.  A couple hours later, he’d progressed to focusing on the corners, bracing himself an inch or so away from the corner and using the leverage to wiggle himself between the bars on the opposite side of the corner.  (Keep in mind, I took him out several times over the course of the afternoon, but whenever I put him back in, he’d rest for a while and then go back to it.)  At 6:45 pm today, I walked into the room just in time to see him finally wiggle the last of the way through the bars.

My budgie taught himself to escape his travel cage in less than 7 hours. 

From this I have learned two things:

  1. I really should not have bought a travel cage with more than half inch bar spacing.  (It was 3/4 of an inch!  Who could predict that a quarter of an inch made such a huge difference!)
  2. Budgies are wicked smart.

I can see how someone would think a bird is a lot of work or money or time, but not how they’d think a bird is boring.  Raz has loads of personality, he’s clever and stubborn and bold as brass, and getting to know him continues to be fascinating.

moreleftthannot:

Wow, imagine that.



Wow, it’s almost as if birth control prevented pregnancy.

moreleftthannot:

Wow, imagine that.

Wow, it’s almost as if birth control prevented pregnancy.

(via madmaudlingoes)

Raz ran around the edge of the cage yelling angrily and trying to stick his head through the bottom bars until I let him out onthe counter. He was so ridiculously pleased, and he kept doing the head bobbing dance. After he ran around a while and tried unsuccessfully to climb the table legs and eat dog hair, I out him back and he sat on his rope perch fluffing his feathers and squeaking.

bettydays:

I scrolled down looking for an explanation and I just

(via madmaudlingoes)

tastefullyoffensive:

Anatomy of Songs [wronghands]

(via longtimegone)

pennypaperbrain:

London Leather
What is it? A psychological novel  about BDSM – i.e. in a bookshop it would be under ‘Fiction A-Z’ rather than in the erotica section. There is kinky sex, but the story is mostly about the daily life of people on the London BDSM scene.
Why’s that important? A lot of people are curious about BDSM. There’s nothing wrong with having fantasies, but novels (and now films) like 50 Shades of Grey present actual BDSM practice in a way that in real life would be flagrantly abusive – and people are learning about BDSM from 50 Shades. That’s dangerous, and worsens the existing stigma against kinky people. The voices of actual BDSM practitioners should be heard on the subject.
Who wrote it? London kink scene veteran Penny Armstrong, who is a professional book editor and writer-for-hire under another name. She also writes fanfic as pennypaperbrain.
Fine, but all I care about in a novel is whether it’s any good. There are both positive and negative reviews of London Leather on amazon.co.uk and amazon.com – check them out to help you decide if you want to read it.
Find out a bit more about the book and read an extract here.
***
Feel free to copy and post this elsewhere if you’d like. Thanks for reading, and keep spreading the message that there’s more to kink than 50 Shades.

Recommending this book again!

pennypaperbrain:

London Leather

What is it? A psychological novel  about BDSM – i.e. in a bookshop it would be under ‘Fiction A-Z’ rather than in the erotica section. There is kinky sex, but the story is mostly about the daily life of people on the London BDSM scene.

Why’s that important? A lot of people are curious about BDSM. There’s nothing wrong with having fantasies, but novels (and now films) like 50 Shades of Grey present actual BDSM practice in a way that in real life would be flagrantly abusive – and people are learning about BDSM from 50 Shades. That’s dangerous, and worsens the existing stigma against kinky people. The voices of actual BDSM practitioners should be heard on the subject.

Who wrote it? London kink scene veteran Penny Armstrong, who is a professional book editor and writer-for-hire under another name. She also writes fanfic as pennypaperbrain.

Fine, but all I care about in a novel is whether it’s any good. There are both positive and negative reviews of London Leather on amazon.co.uk and amazon.com – check them out to help you decide if you want to read it.

Find out a bit more about the book and read an extract here.

***

Feel free to copy and post this elsewhere if you’d like. Thanks for reading, and keep spreading the message that there’s more to kink than 50 Shades.

Recommending this book again!

Birdventures

So my parents have two dogs, and they are fascinated by Raz. Max is mostly just staring, but Zero is growling and whining and barking and with his whole body saying, “yay is new tiny friend why don’t you come out tiny friend come out and playyyyyyy.” Raz is unfazed, but it is 100% hilarious.

asker

invisible-spectra asked: Did you know that hermit crabs can live longer than cockatiels? Most don't know that they need to be kept at a 70% humidity all the time (that means a TEN GALLON tank with a heat lamp) and it must be kept at over 75 degrees at all times. You have to dechlorinate the water and give them toys, mist them daily... You need to bathe them too, and hermies love to run. Yet somehow all of this was ignored and they are sold in mass with tiny plastic mesh cages. It breaks my heart. Most die in a week.

pepperandpals:

Yeeeeaaaaah hermit crabs have it SUPER rough too. I live near-ish to water and people sell them like souvenirs at the beach. It’s pretty horrendous. Plus when I lived in Savannah there was a lot of those hipster Earthbound stores that sold them as basically accessories. Sometimes it seems like people will pretty much ignore the sentience of anything invertebrate.

I’ve never had hermit crabs, so I definitely didn’t know all that! They are interesting little guys who don’t get anywhere near the amount of respect they deserve.  

Thanks for sharing! Keep on keeping on with #SmallPetRespect!

Wow,I never knew this. Now I’m sad for hermit crabs too. :(

camwyn:

spinningyarns:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.So.Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humansCelsius: what temperatures affect waterKelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

Why didn’t my science teachers ever see fit to toss off this little fact?

If they were anything like mine, because they were too busy making fun of the Fahrenheit scale for not being Scientific Enough.

camwyn:

spinningyarns:

doctorbee:

xwidep:

Scales

This is because Fahrenheit is based on a brine scale and the human body. The scale is basically how cold does it have to be to freeze saltwater (zero Fahrenheit) to what temperature is the human body (100-ish Fahrenheit, although now we know that’s not exactly accurate). Fahrenheit was designed around humans.

Celsius and Kelvin are designed around the natural world.

Celsius is a scale based on water. Zero is when water freezes, 100 is when water boils.

Kelvin uses the same scale as Celsius (one degree, as a unit, is the same between the two), but defines zero as absolute zero, which is basically the temperature at which atoms literally stop doing that spinning thing. Nothing can exist below zero Kelvin. It’s the bottom of the scale.

So.
Fahrenheit: what temperatures affect humans
Celsius: what temperatures affect water
Kelvin: what temperatures affect atoms

Why didn’t my science teachers ever see fit to toss off this little fact?

If they were anything like mine, because they were too busy making fun of the Fahrenheit scale for not being Scientific Enough.

(via madmaudlingoes)